Oracle 10g - stands for grid at a tenth of the price

Larry Ellison, President of Oracle, said at a recent conference that a twin processor Lintel server for USD5000 is the only rational building block for enterprise computing. It is faster and nearly ten times cheaper than the equivalent power on a mainframe or UNIX server. This statement is at the heart of his drive for grid computing in the latest Oracle release 10g. Peter Abrahams of IT-Director.com comments.


Market Analysis

Oracle 10g - stands for grid at a tenth of the price
Larry Ellison, President of Oracle, said at a recent conference that a twin processor Lintel server for USD5000 is the only rational building block for enterprise computing. It is faster and nearly ten times cheaper than the equivalent power on a mainframe or UNIX server. This statement is at the heart of his drive for grid computing in the latest Oracle release 10g.

The only problem is that you have to put a lot of them together in a grid to give the power needed. They have to have the right OS, middleware and application software installed. Then they have to be configured and connected together. If the load changes significantly, either because of a long term growth in transaction volumes, or by a sudden on-demand surge, they have to be extended and reconfigured to cope. If there is a hardware failure changes have to be made to reallocate the load.

All of this is expensive and time consuming and is compounded when the software has to maintained, upgraded or have emergency patches applied to multiple systems in a co-ordinated and error-free manner.

The total cost of the human effort required to keep these systems going, let alone the inevitable cost of human error, far outweighed the reduced hardware cost. IBM and Sun have been successfully using this true story for many years.

The seemingly obvious answer is for IT to take its own medicine and automate these manual, largely clerical, tasks. Surprisingly the traditional system management vendors did not reach that conclusion or provide the software.

Oracle, with RAC, had been doing some of this for its database for a couple of years. And if Larry's vision of a grid was to become reality it was essential to automate as much as possible of the manual system management.

Oracle has therefore looked at all aspects of system management. They did a survey and found that 26% of their time was spent in provisioning, 6% loading data, 55% with monitoring and on-going maintenance. The unexplained 15% is presumably used drinking coffee and trying to find a more interesting job!

In 10g, Oracle has put a lot of effort into this area with Enterprise Manager and believes that they have decimated the effort by reducing it to a tenth (for the Latin experts I apologise for using the word to mean reduced to a tenth, rather than reduced by a tenth).

How have they done this?

Firstly by greatly simplifying the installation of all Oracle software; any installation process now asks a minimum of two and a maximum of five questions and these can be pre-recorded to enable totally silent install.

The system stores information about all software, release levels and patches and will either automatically download patches and install them or lead the system programmer through this process so they can decide when to do the actual install.

All upgrades can now be done on-line without having to take the system down. New levels of the software are designed so that they can run in parallel with previous versions.

New servers can be cloned automatically from existing servers.

The system is monitored for performance and security issues. Policies can be defined that specify what to do when thresholds are reached, including adding extra servers on demand and releasing capacity that is no longer required.

Oracle has extended its database server and application server to provide more detailed monitoring information as well as taking advantage of the Enterprise Manager functions. Although EM works best when used with Oracle products it is not limited to supporting these products but can be extended to support anything in its eco-system.

It really does appear that Oracle has done enough to make the grid built out of commodity servers a practical and economic reality. And as a by-product they have made the management of smaller systems easier as well.

This functionality is very good news for existing Oracle users but it also makes Oracle much more attractive for the rest of the IT world.


Copyright 2003. Originally published by IT-Director.com, reprinted with permission. IT-Director.com provides IT decision makers with free daily e-mails containing news analysis, member-only discussion forums, free research, technology spotlights and free on-line consultancy. To register for a free e-mail subscription, click here.

For more information:

  • Looking for free research? Browse our comprehensive White Papers section by topic, author or keyword.
  • Are you tired of technospeak? The Web Services Advisor column uses plain talk and avoids the hype.
  • For insightful opinion and commentary from today's industry leaders, read our Guest Commentary columns.
  • Hey Codeheads! Start benefiting from these time-saving XML Developer Tips and .NET Developer Tips.

  • Visit our huge Best Web Links for Web Services collection for the freshest editor-selected resources.
  • Visit Ask the Experts for answers to your Web services, SOAP, WSDL, XML, .NET, Java and EAI questions.
  • Couldn't attend one of our Webcasts? Don't miss out. Visit our archive to watch at your own convenience.
  • Choking on the alphabet soup of industry acronyms? Visit our helpful Glossary for the latest lingo.
  • Discuss this article, voice your opinion or talk with your peers in the SearchWebServices Discussion Forums.
This Content Component encountered an error

Pro+

Features

Enjoy the benefits of Pro+ membership, learn more and join.

0 comments

Oldest 

Forgot Password?

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an email containing your password.

Your password has been sent to:

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchSoftwareQuality

SearchCloudApplications

SearchAWS

TheServerSide

SearchWinDevelopment

Close