lowerCamelCase definition

Contributor(s): Tony McAffee

lowerCamelCase (part of CamelCase) is a naming convention in which a name is formed of multiple words that are joined together as a single word with the first letter of each of the multiple words (except the first one) capitalized within the new word that forms the name. A variation is called UpperCamelCase in which the first letter of the new word is upper case, allowing it to be easily distinguished from a lowerCamelCase name. (The name derives from the hump or humps that seem to appear in any CamelCase name.) The advantage of CamelCase is that in any computer system where the letters in a name have to be contiguous (no spaces), a more meaningful name can be created using a descriptive sequence of words without violating the naming limitation.

CamelCase gained popularity as a convention with WikiWiki (pronounced wikee wikee; wiki means "quick" in Hawaiian) software, which automatically creates and identifies hypertext links in Web pages and is used in Wikipedia, the user-contributed encyclopedia. CamelCase is now used in a number of World Wide Web Consortium-recommended protocols, such as the Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP), Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language (SMIL), and Extensible Markup Language (XML).

This was first published in September 2005

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