colocation (colo)

A colocation (colo) is a data center facility in which a business can rent space for servers and other computing hardware.

Typically, a colo provides the building, cooling, power, bandwidth and physical security while the customer provides servers and storage. Space in the facility is often leased by the rack, cabinet, cage or room. Many colos have extended their offerings to include managed services that support their customers' business initiatives.

There are several reasons a business might choose a colo over building its own data center, but one of the main drivers is the capital expenditures (CAPEX) associated with building, maintaining and updating a large computing facility. In the past, colos were often used by private enterprises for disaster recovery. Today, colos are especially popular with cloud service providers.

For some organizations, colocation may be an ideal solution, but there can be downsides to this approach. Distance can translate into increased travel costs when equipment needs to be touched manually and colo customers can find themselves locked into long-term contracts, which may prevent them from re-negotiating rates when prices fall.  It is important for an organization to closely examine their colo's service level agreements (SLAs) so as not to be surprised by hidden charges.


 

 

 

 

 

Contributor(s): Don Brancato and David S. Jones
This was last updated in September 2013
Posted by: Margaret Rouse
View the next item in this Essential Guide: service-level agreement (SLA) or view the full guide: Colocated data centers uncut: Avoid these costly errors

More News and Tutorials

  • SOA, semantics and services combine in DoD intelligence sharing effort

    Using textual analytics and natural language processing, Modus Operandi developed a service that analyzes and parses unstructured data and pulls out events or information. Article includes tips on SOA and semantics, SOA and data models, and an SOA recipe for stone soup.Among highlights: Recognize that not everything can be or should be shared.

  • Q&A: Messaging middleware with Apache projects

    In this Q&A, Rob Davies discusses messaging middleware and the hurdles that many developers face as they first approach the subject. Davis is CTO of FuseSource and coauthor of the book "ActiveMQ in Action."

  • An SOA practices checklist for implementation roadmaps

    This article provides a master list of common practices, field proven by a number of SOA projects. Also supplied is a template that can be used as a checklist for developing SOA implementation roadmaps specific to an organization's transition project requirements.

There are Comments. Add yours.

 
TIP: Want to include a code block in your comment? Use <pre> or <code> tags around the desired text. Ex: <code>insert code</code>

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
Sort by: OldestNewest

Forgot Password?

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an email containing your password.

Your password has been sent to:

Research More Tech Terms

  • Search thousands of tech definitions
  • Browse tech definitions
    Browse Alphabetically:

Powered by WhatIs.com

File Extensions and File Formats

File Extension and File Formats List:

Powered by WhatIs.com