XrML (Extensible Rights Markup Language) definition

XrML (Extensible Rights Markup Language) is a proposed standard digital rights management (DRM) markup language. The XML-based language enables users to specify rights and conditions associated with resources, such as digital content or Web services. A single standard language for DRM would facilitate the buying and selling of content over the Internet, while at the same time protecting that content from unauthorized use. ContentGuard, Hewlett-Packard, Microsoft, Reuters and VeriSign are among the companies promoting XrML.

XrML was developed from Digital Property Rights Language (DPRL), a Lisp-based language developed by Mark Stefik of Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center. Stefik created DPRL as a machine-readable language that could be used to define access rules and procedures, for use with the trusted PC. Stefik made DPRL 2.0 XML-based, because XML is extensible and thus, interoperable with other emerging standards and able to adapt to changing needs.

Xerox, with collaboration from Microsoft launched a new company for the development and promotion of DPRL. In 2000, that company, ContentGuard, released XrML as a refined version of the earlier language.

This was first published in September 2005

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